Shiitake Mushroom Nutrition

Shiitake

Shiitake Mushroom Nutrition
By Nicole Wolverton

Shiitake mushrooms, a variety of Japanese mushroom, are available throughout the United States in grocery stores and specialty shops. The Mushroom Growers’ Newsletter reports that shiitake mushrooms are the second most produced mushroom worldwide, enjoying a growing popularity. This mushroom finds use in a variety of recipes, known for their rich, smoky flavor.

Calories

A 1-cup serving of shiitake mushrooms contains 81.2 calories. This represents 4 percent of the calories you may include in your meal plan each day, based on a 2,000-calorie diet. While you can eat these mushrooms on their own, it’s more common for them to be a part of a dish.

Macronutrients

The majority of calories in shiitake mushrooms come from carbohydrates — a 1-cup serving contains 20.9g. The carbohydrates in your diet primarily serve as energy, after your body converts them to glucose. This portion of shiitake mushrooms also provides you with 2.3g of protein and 0.3g of fat.
Vitamins

Shiitake mushrooms serve as a rich source of B vitamins. One cup contains 52.1 percent of the daily recommended value of vitamin B-5, also known as pantothenic acid. This vitamin may play a role in treating acne, alcoholism, asthma, autism, heart failure, depression and convulsions, among other conditions. A 1-cup serving of shiitake mushrooms also provides 24.5 percent of the vitamin B-2 you need each day, 10.9 percent of vitamin B-3 and 11.5 percent of vitamin B-6.
Minerals

Selenium, an essential mineral for your body’s function, is found in abundance in shiitake mushrooms. A 1-cup serving has 51.4 percent of the selenium you need daily. This mineral helps your body manufacture proteins that prevent cell damage, and it may decrease your risk of developing some types of cancer. One cup of shiitake mushrooms also contains 3.5 percent of the daily recommended value of iron, a mineral your body uses to make blood cells.

Benefits

Research published in the November 2010 issue of “The Journal of Nutrition” notes that shiitake mushrooms reduced arthritis pain in mice; human studies are needed to determine if shiitake mushrooms will benefit humans in the same way. The American Cancer Society also notes that shiitake mushrooms may influence the immune system, which may prevent cancer and AIDS from developing or getting worse. These mushrooms may also lower your cholesterol. Research is needed to confirm these claims.

References

CalorieLab: Mushrooms, Shiitake, Cooked, Without Salt
The Mushroom Growers’ Newsletter: A Small-Scale Agriculture Alternative: Shiitake Mushrooms
MedlinePlus: Carbohydrates
MedlinePlus: Pantothenic Acid
MedlinePlus: Selenium in Diet
MedlinePlus: Iron in Diet


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